Vaulted ceilings: Understanding the basics and design


Vaulted ceilings are one of the most ancient kind of false ceilings, usually found in cathedrals and roman architecture.

Innovation and craftsmanship have given way to some of the most antiquate false ceiling designs in recent times. However, this doesn’t mean that such designer ceilings were not seen in the ancient and medieval era. In fact, some of the most beautiful historical architecture in the world have exemplary ceiling designs which can leave anyone spellbound. Once such type of ceiling is vaulted ceilings which is often used in homes with sloped roofs. In India, such roofs are common on hill stations. Also known as cathedral ceiling, vaulted ceilings have started getting attention even in regular homes. If you too are planning to add some grandeur in your new home, here’s everything you need to know about it:

What is vaulted ceiling?

A vaulted ceiling is a self-supporting arch above walls and under a roof. For a modern household, a vaulted ceiling extends upward from walls to the centre, creating a volume of space just above the head. Basically, such ceilings convert the typical flat ceiling into more usable roof structure space and add grandness to the room.

The first vaulted ceilings were made 7,000 years ago. Such ceilings are found across the world across ages, especially in the Gothic architectural structures, cathedrals and buildings from the Roman Empire. There are different types of vaulted ceiling designs such as barrel, rib and fan.

Where to use vaulted ceiling?

Such ceilings are ideal for spaces like open kitchen-living-dining room or even in bedrooms, if the structures allow it. A vaulted ceiling can also be included if you want to add rustic charm in combination with reclaimed beams or industrial cable supports to your space. People usually prefer such ceilings in great rooms which have sort of open layout.

Also read: Everything you need to know about wooden false ceilings

Pros and cons of vaulted ceiling

Pros Cons
It creates a sense of spaciousness as it provides overhead space in a room Vaulted ceilings are not energy-efficient as these are higher ceilings and requires more electricity to cool or heat.
The additional height brings in extra natural light by leaving more room for tall windows. Such ceiling designs are harder to maintain than regular/normal ceilings.
It adds a dramatic effect to the space. Vaulted ceilings are difficult and expensive to retrofit.
Blends with any kind of space  

Design ideas for vaulted ceiling

Vaulted ceilings: Understanding the basics and design

Source: thisoldhouse.com

Vaulted ceilings: Understanding the basics and design

Source: Plank and Pillow

Vaulted ceilings: Understanding the basics and design

Source: bobvilla.com

 

Vaulted ceilings: Understanding the basics and design

Source: bobvilla.com

 

Vaulted ceilings: Understanding the basics and design

Source: tilsonhomes.com

Vaulted ceilings: Understanding the basics and design

Source: Shutterstock

Vaulted ceilings: Understanding the basics and design

Source: architectureartdesigns.com

FAQs

What does a vaulted ceiling mean?

These are self-supporting ceilings placed above the walls and under the roof, sloped upwards toward the centre.

Are vaulted ceilings worth it?

Vaulted ceilings are expensive, but it could take advantage of wasted roof space overhead.

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